Bibliography
June 20, 2014
Heyday books
Photographs by Richard Nagle
Looking-at-Art-the-Art-of-Looking
Looking at Art, the Art of Looking
Playful and profound exchanges between people and art
Gottfried Helnwein, Epiphany II (Adoration of the Shepherds) (1998), de Young Museum, Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco.
Gottfried Helnwein, Epiphany II (Adoration of the Shepherds) (1998), de Young Museum, Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco.
Photo: Richard Nagler
Pablo Picasso, Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907), Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Richard Nagler
Titian, Danaë (c. 1555), Art Institute of Chicago.
2014, Photo: Richard Nagler
Ellsworth Kelly, Cite (1951), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
Photo: Richard Nagler

In museums across the world, Richard Nagler stationed himself in front of his chosen piece of art, waiting for someone to come along and complete it. The serendipitous, unstaged encounters between art and individuals documented in Looking at Art are the results of that patience.

At first, the egalitarian relationship between person and artwork seems perplexing: the art is not relegated to the background, nor is the individual considered a disruption. In Nagler’s photographs, artwork and individual are presented as equals, each one mirroring and amplifying aspects of the other. The viewer takes on some of the power of the art by echoing an image or theme; and at the same time, the artwork takes on added depth by its momentary association with its viewer. The transformative power of art has been widely acknowledged, but Nagler also shows us art’s need to be transformed and given meaning by humanity.

Allen Ginsberg once said, “Every one of [Nagler’s] photographs brings to my mind a haiku.” Like that poetic form, these images display masterful skill and restraint, yet they also convey a sense of immediacy and undeniable vitality. A celebration of the connection between people and art, Looking at Art captures fleeting moments of wholeness.

Looking at Art, the Art of Looking
2014
Photographs by Richard Nagler; Foreword by Malcolm Margolin

Paperback, 10 x 11, 128 pages, with over 80 full-color photographs ISBN: 978-1-59714-266-3

Hardcover, 10 x 11, 128 pages, with over 80 full-color photographs ISBN: 978-1-59714-268-




back to the top